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Unusual Symptoms referring to Brain Cancer cancer ended up into something else

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Unusual Symptoms referring to Brain Cancer cancer ended up into something else

Cancer was undoubted clarification for the bizarre manifestations that Rachel Palma experienced start in January 2018.

She said:

“I was having involuntary movements with my right hand, so I was dropping things,” the Middletown, New York, inhabitant said. “The worst symptoms obviously were hallucinations. The computer screen looked completely different — it was almost foreign. What I perceived was different and so how I was responding was different — if someone was asking for a pen, I would give them, for example, a key. But as soon as they ruled out a brain bleed, I was discharged. Although I was a danger to myself and probably to others, they still discharged me. They said, ‘If you're not actually having a brain bleed, then it's not actually an emergency.”

On a mind examine, Palma's doctor recognized a little injury and promptly sent her to Dr. Jonathan Rasouli. Rasouli  said:

“We decided it would probably be in her best interest to do a biopsy of this lesion.”

Palma said:

“I was told that it was most likely a malignant tumor, which would require radiation and chemo even after the surgery.”

Rasouli told CNN:

“Her fiancé had just proposed to her and they were looking to move in together and then all of a sudden she had this diagnosis of a brain tumor. Can you imagine?”

Her first task, basically an “arranging medical procedure,” clarified Rasouli, occurred on September 2, 2018. A second medical procedure to expel the presumed tumor pursued on September 12.

“We did a small dissection of the brain tissue and what we saw was a very well encapsulated, firm lesion that was ovoid,” said Rasouli. “It looked like a quail egg: Same size, same look, same firmness.”

A tapeworm was found inside Rachel Palma's mind.

He said at the time:

“Wait a second, this is clearly not a brain tumor. It doesn't look like a quail egg. Most brain tumors are very soft, very mushy, they're not very well defined, they're infiltrative and it's difficult to get completely around them.”

He added:

 “And what came out was a baby tapeworm. If you live in the US, it's almost impossible to get this.”

Neurocysticercosis is the medicinal term for when an infant pork tapeworm advances toward the cerebrum.

Rasouli said:

“It is not super-duper rare, it's just pretty uncommon. If we had any suspicion that she could have been exposed to pork tapeworm or we thought this was potentially a parasite, we ideally would have treated her with antibiotics rather than taking her into surgery.”

Palma said:

“There's absolutely no explanation as to how I contracted it. This is not something that is cause for widespread panic. What happened to me is extremely rare — it's not the norm — for someone who has not been overseas to contract this. If you have symptoms that you cannot explain or are concerning to you, then please see a doctor. And see a good doctor. Not every headache turns out to be a parasite”

Today, Palma has no side effects and is feeling fine.

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Cancer

Study Finds Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) Block Breast Cancer Cell Development

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Study Finds Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) Block Breast Cancer Cell Development

A recent study by Ayush Arpit Garg et al. studied breast cancer cells and found that the use of electric fields helped in hindering the growing process of breast cancer cells; not to forget hindering its ability to move spontaneously discloses Reports Healthcare.

Electromagnetic Fields Limit Breast Cancer Cell Movements

Electromagnetic field is a field produced by electrically charged objects and is believed to stimulate current to flow through the body. It turns out that a low-intensity level electric fields may suppress cancer cells growth, which is achieved by preventing the creation of extensions found at the ends of the cancer cell called actin-rich filopodia.

Akt phosphorylation, commonly known as a pathway that supports survival and growth in response to extracellular signals through protein presence, was also used with the electromagnetic fields. This resulted in limiting the cell’s ability to move freely.

The results were attainable through the use of Helmholtz coil, a tool that the team of researchers built. As per the claims made, the instrument allowed for “real-time monitoring of cell motility dynamics.”

In addition to understanding cells movement, the Helmholtz coil is promoted as having the capacity to identify different types of cancer cells, evaluate how cells respond to EMFs and the latter’s role in cancer as reported by the health-focused platform.

In Conclusion

To put things into retrospect, the researchers shared that,

“These results represent a step towards isolating the coupling mechanism between cell motility and iEFs (induced Electric Fields), provide valuable insights into how iEFs target multiple diverging cancer cell signalling mechanisms.”

They further added that cells are able to notice the existence of electromagnetic fields and that the electrical signals are essential regulators for cancel cell migration. The latter is important to consider, as said cells are known for their ability to spread throughout the body.

Given the nature of the experiment, i.e. in a lab setting, it has been argued that an actual animal and human testing is required to fully make sense of the benefits of using electric signals. Nonetheless, the findings presented above can be deemed a stepping stone towards finding a successful cancer treatment.

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Cancer

University of Findlay Pharmacy Students Work on Glioblastoma Treatment with Compound Found in Curry

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University of Findlay Pharmacy Students Work on Glioblastoma Treatment with Compound Found in Curry
  • A substance found in curry could aid in treating glioblastoma.
  • The treatment is being researched and developed by individuals at the University of Findlay.

Cancer is a disease that plagues millions of people each year. In fact, statistics show that nearly 40% of all Americans will be diagnosed with some type of cancer before the end of their lives. At the University of Findlay, pharmacy students have made some progress on discovering a treatment for one of the deadliest types of cancer – glioblastoma.

Glioblastoma is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, and it thrives in the brain and/or spinal cord. With almost no way to remove it safely, and very little that can be treated with chemotherapy, experts have found that less than 10% of people diagnosed with this cancer will survive for more than five years. Jacob Reyes, UF College of Pharmacy graduate student researcher, stated,

“What they have right now is great in terms of glioblastoma, but it’s not enough in terms of survival rates that you’re seeing.”

A new drug has already been developed by the UF researchers, which they believe will improve the lifespan of sufferers of this specific type of brain cancer. Reyes stated that the team used a molecule called chalcone, which is found in curry.

Dr. Rahul Khupse, a medicinal chemist involved with the project, grew up in India, and discovered that chalcone can help with both inflammation and cancer properties in the body. He said,

“In my grad school, I had worked on natural products, and that was kind of like an inspiration for making this designer drug.” Right now, the drug is presently called RK-15.

Uniquely, this treatment has the ability to selectively target the cancer cells in the brain and doesn’t attack the healthy cells. While chemotherapy touches on multiple parts of the body and can have substantial side effects, Dr. Khupse aimed to achieve this selective therapy to preserve the rest of the brain. In doing so, RK-15 is capable of penetrating the brain-blood barrier, and still treats resistance cancer cells.

Reyes commented, “What if, by chance, something were to have activity and down the road someday, I look back and think like wow, that's the drug I worked on and here it is saving lives?”

Undilutedly, the researchers have a long way to go, and will start testing on animals in the next stage. Once it passes animal testing, clinical testing on humans will start, followed by approval from the FDA.

From creating a treatment in the lab to delivering it to patients, the process can take up to 15 years. The research team from the University is presently in their second year of development.

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